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  • The UK’s Energy Intensive Industries need Lower Electricity Prices, not more Taxpayer Compensation

    The UK’s Energy Intensive Industries need Lower Electricity Prices, not more Taxpayer Compensation

    Daniel Mahoney | | Energy
    The closure of SSI’s steel plant in Redcar along with the further announcement of job losses at Tata Steel has focused minds on the future of the UK’s energy intensive industries, which support 600,000 jobs and account for around 4% of the UK’s economy [link].  The Government has blamed a ...
  • Universal free school meals are a Lib Dem leftover that need binning

    Universal free school meals are a Lib Dem leftover that need binning

    Lewis Brown | | Public Services
    A version of this article appeared in Nursery World magazine.‘Universal free school meals’ is one of those evocative policy ideas that well-intentioned do-gooders insist is vital in improving the attainment of young pupils. The reaction to their proposed withdrawal is reminiscent of the early 1970s when then-education secretary Margaret Thatcher ...
  • Underemployment in the UK

    Underemployment in the UK

    William Sternberg | | Employment
    At 5.5%, the UK has one of the lowest unemployment rates in Europe. However, this apparent success is masking the prevalence of underemployment in the UK economy. Underemployed workers can be seen as those individuals who have a job (thus not unemployed) but are being underutilised. The Office of National ...
  • The Spending Review: Not out of the woods yet

    The Spending Review: Not out of the woods yet

    Adam Memon | | Economy
    This article is taken from the CPS Economic Bulletin. To receive the bulletin to your inbox before it is published online, subscribe here. Turmoil in financial markets across the world has shone a spotlight on the vulnerability of the UK to external shocks. In recent years, the UK economy has performed strongly in ...
  • Within striking distance - trade union reform

    Within striking distance - trade union reform

    Adam Memon | | Politics
    A version of this article was originally published by the New Statesman. Keir Hardie would be aghast if he could see the state of the trade union movement today. Its reputation has been comprehensively trashed and the sad truth is that, too often, this is completely justified. Knee-jerk, reactionary opposition to ...
  • Corbynomics is not fit for government

    Corbynomics is not fit for government

    Adam Memon | | Economy
    This article originally appeared on CapX. Jeremy Corbyn, who is now leader of the Labour Party, proposes what amounts to a government takeover of the British economy. It is an economic programme which is almost entirely ignorant of the success of free enterprise. On Wednesday, for example, the World Health Organisation ...
  • Eurozone structural reforms: a follow up

    Eurozone structural reforms: a follow up

    Madeleine Thornton | | Economy
    PortugalPortuguese austerity measures are ticking all of the right boxes: real GDP growth is forecast to be 1.5% for 2015 and 1.7% a year 2016-2019, the Government are repaying their loans ahead of schedule and the authorities’ short-term macroeconomic projections are in keeping with The European Commission’s 2015 spring forecast. ...
  • The UK must not miss out on Brazil

    The UK must not miss out on Brazil

    William Sternberg | | Trade
    Almost 200 years ago the UK first established diplomatic relations with Brazil. Since then, we have seen a considerable rise in Brazil’s economic power and its GDP (PPP) is now greater than that of the UK. It is likely that Brazil’s economic and global influence will continue to grow and ...
  • Progress on Eurozone structural reforms

    Progress on Eurozone structural reforms

    Madeleine Thornton | | Europe
    The Eurozone crisis has given the EU a near impossible task: to identify a common interest among a set of increasingly heterogeneous nation states. Consequently, the economic union that the EU so desperately tries to promote is fragmenting: the UK electorate has called for an EU referendum and German taxpayers ...
  • Why we need to improve economic ties with China

    Why we need to improve economic ties with China

    William Sternberg | | China
    Even with the recent news about China’s slowing economy causing volatile markets worldwide, with a population of 1.3bn and the largest economy in the world by GDP (PPP), there can be no doubt that China has the potential to be an even more important trade, tourism, investment and economic partner ...
  • China's structural weaknesses

    China's structural weaknesses

    Madeleine Thornton | | Economy
    As the world’s second largest economy and the contributor of 15% of global GDP, the volume of discussion surrounding China’s market meltdown is warranted. With stocks down 8.5%, the Shanghai Composite’s worst single-day fall in since 2008, waves of uncertainty are rippling across the globe: the Japanese Nikkei fell by ...
  • People’s QE would be disastrous

    People’s QE would be disastrous

    Aatif Khan | | Economy
    Despite the proletarian name tag, the effects of PQE would lead to irreconcilable damage in U.K monetary policy and price stability. Scarcity is the lynchpin concept of economics, but it’s abolished in the domain of PQE. Richard Murphy, the architect of Corbynomics, plainly admits who pays for the additional investment ...
  • The Green Revolution we need

    The Green Revolution we need

    Adam Memon | | Environment
    This article is taken from the CPS Economic Bulletin. To receive the bulletin to your inbox before it is published online, subscribe here. Vitamin A deficiency causes enormous suffering amongst those afflicted by it with blindness and ultimately death being the final outcomes for many in the developing World. The World Health Organisation ...
  • London needs more than this Night Tube

    London needs more than this Night Tube

    This autumn, despite further delays announced today, we should have our promised Night Tube which will be running on five major lines throughout Friday and Saturday nights. Immediately there should be benefits; TfL’s analysis suggests that the Night Tube will create 1,965 new jobs adding £360m to the economy over ...
  • Corbynomics: A path to penury

    Corbynomics: A path to penury

    Adam Memon | | Economy
    This article is taken from the CPS Economic Bulletin. To receive the bulletin to your inbox before it is published online, subscribe here. The expansion of capitalism and free markets in recent decades has led to incredible economic and social progress; the fastest fall in extreme poverty in human history, rising ...