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Blogs by Owen Brady

  • “Britain: For the Love of God, Please Stop David Cameron” – a Response

    “Britain: For the Love of God, Please Stop David Cameron” – a Response

    | Economy
    “David Cameron’s government has managed the country’s economy with stunning fecklessness” – this is the charge.Benjamin Studebaker made this claim on his blog, in a post that has gone viral, with 100,000 views, and 10,000 shares on Facebook. It certainly makes an impression, with its densely packed charts and earnest rhetoric. ...
  • Green or Communist? Take the manifesto test!

    Green or Communist? Take the manifesto test!

    | Politics
    The Communist Party has released their General Election manifesto, to great fanfare (well, one of their candidates got to go on Daily Politics). Without wanting to give too much away, much of it seems to be not particularly Communist, and occasionally less left-wing than the Green Party.Can you identify which ...
  • Iceland rips up the rulebook on central banking?

    Iceland rips up the rulebook on central banking?

    | Economy
    Iceland has had a pretty tough time, recently.Following the collapse of its banking sector in 2008, unemployment tripled and the country was forced to accept a bailout from the IMF. To add insult to injury, the country’s McDonald’s franchise shut up shop, leaving the last remaining McDonald’s meal in the ...
  • Whatever happened to free-market UKIP?

    Whatever happened to free-market UKIP?

    | Politics
    Looking back at an interview of Nigel Farage at the IEA in 2010, it was striking to see him give such a direct, unambiguous, principled argument in favour of free trade:“If we are going to be a successful nation …, part of the 21st-century global economy, then protectionism [is] a ...
  • Current Account Deficit - Reasons not to worry

    Current Account Deficit - Reasons not to worry

    | Economy
    The UK economy has produced some record-breaking data, according to an ONS bulletin released last week. In 2014, the current-account deficit was at its largest, by a certain measure, since records began in 1948. It was valued at 5.5% of GDP, or £98bn. A record-breaking deficit may inspire concern – ...