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Publications

Welfare Dependency Falls But Still Much Further To Go

Welfare Dependency Falls But Still Much Further To Go

- Social Policy

Over half of all UK households are still receiving more from the state than they pay in taxes.

The Poodle Bites Back: Select Committees and the Revival of Parliament

The Poodle Bites Back: Select Committees and the Revival of Parliament

Andrew Tyrie - Politics

Andrew Tyrie MP, Chairman of the Treasury Select Committee, argues that despite the ‘anti-politics’ mood in the UK, the House of Commons is achieving notable success in reforming itself into a more effective institution.

The Case for an Office for Inter-generational Responsibility

The Case for an Office for Inter-generational Responsibility

Michael Johnson - Economy

Michael Johnson responds to the OBR’s latest annual Fiscal Sustainability report, warning that UK debt is snowballing with frightening momentum – and it is the young who will be hit hardest.

How to cut Inheritance Tax

How to cut Inheritance Tax

Adam Memon - Economy

Make inheritance tax fairer by simplifying the system with a broader base and lower rate, and eliminating many of the existing inefficient tax reliefs.

Who will care for Generation Y?

Who will care for Generation Y?

Michael Johnson - Economy

Michael Johnson warns that Generation Y could be the first generation to experience a quality of life below that of its (baby boomer) parents.

A Suggestion for the Housing and Planning Minister

A Suggestion for the Housing and Planning Minister

Keith Boyfield and Daniel Greenberg - Economy

Keith Boyfield and Daniel Greenberg urge Brandon Lewis to seize the opportunity of a new Government to tackle Britain’s housing shortage.

Some suggestions for the new pensions minister

Some suggestions for the new pensions minister

Michael Johnson - Economy

Pensions analyst Michael Johnson urges new pensions minister Ros Altmann to continue with the bold reforms that her predecessor began.

Unleashing the Sharing Economy

Unleashing the Sharing Economy

Adam Memon & Tim Knox - Economy

The Government should go further and faster to promote the Sharing Economy.

The Triple Challenge Facing Britain's Oil and Gas Sector

The Triple Challenge Facing Britain's Oil and Gas Sector

Adam Memon, Angeliki Terpou & Tim Knox - Energy

Britain has the highest operating costs in the World for oil production. Radical reform is needed to stem the tide of rising costs, falling prices and heavy taxation.

Competition can Crush Crony Corporatism

Competition can Crush Crony Corporatism

Adam Memon & Tim Knox - Economy

Urgent policy reform is needed to reclaim popular capitalism from crony corporatists.

Real Finnish Lessons: The true story of an education superpower

Real Finnish Lessons: The true story of an education superpower

Gabriel Heller Sahlgren - Public Services

Gabriel Heller Sahlgren challenges conventional wisdom regarding the reasons for Finland’s remarkable education success.

Is Public Borrowing Justified if for Investment Only?

Is Public Borrowing Justified if for Investment Only?

Nicos Zafiris - Economy

The idea has received renewed interest in the current election campaign and in the context of the ongoing deficit/debt reduction debate. But is it right?

A Tax on Business is a Tax on Jobs

A Tax on Business is a Tax on Jobs

Adam Memon & Tim Knox - Economy

The level of business taxation is critical because it directly affects investment, employment and ultimately the prosperity of a nation.

The Red Herring of Departmental Cuts

The Red Herring of Departmental Cuts

Adam Memon & Tim Knox - Politics

Conservative plans for departmental spending cuts are only half those implied by the OBR

Central Planning with Market Features: how renewable subsidies destroyed the UK electricity market

Central Planning with Market Features: how renewable subsidies destroyed the UK electricity market

Rupert Darwall - Energy

Rupert Darwall shows that recent energy policy represents the biggest expansion of state power since the nationalisations of the 1940s and 1950s – and is on course to be the most expensive domestic policy disaster in modern British history.