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Blogs in Economy

  • Travers and Whitehead on the mansion tax

    Travers and Whitehead on the mansion tax

    Ryan Bourne | | Economy
    Tony Travers and Christine Whitehead have an interesting paper out on the housing market as part of the LSE’s “Creating the Conditions for Growth” series, which landed on my desk yesterday. As part of it, they review the situation on property taxation, in particular the so-called “mansion tax”. Lucian Cook ...
  • More thoughts on the IMF's wealth confiscation paper

    More thoughts on the IMF's wealth confiscation paper

    Ryan Bourne | | Economy
    In my City AM column on Tuesday, I outlined how the IMF’s most recent Fiscal Monitor document, entitled “Taxing Times”, laid the intellectual work for an escalation of the tax burden (particularly on the wealthy). It was a huge shift from what you might expect the IMF to say. Sure, ...
  • Lessons from the Royal Mail share scheme

    Lessons from the Royal Mail share scheme

    Ryan Bourne | | Economy
    The Royal Mail share scheme has gone through in what the Daily Telegraph report as “one of the most popular share offers in UK history”. The institutional offer was 20 times oversubscribed and the retail offer 7 times oversubscribed. Some might call that “popular capitalism”, others have claimed that this ...
  • Ed Balls speech: the good, the bad and the ugly

    Ed Balls speech: the good, the bad and the ugly

    Ryan Bourne | | Economy
    Today, Ed Balls made a speech to the Labour party conference in Brighton, which (given his brief) unsurprisingly focused on the economy. Many of the “big” announcements had already been trailed over the weekend and this morning, and most other policy commitments re-iterated from previous announcements. But I think it ...
  • Yay, more

    Yay, more "free" stuff

    Ryan Bourne | | Economy
    The Lib Dems have today announced that all 5-7 year olds will now be given “free” school meals. And there was me thinking we had huge public borrowing? The proposal, which has almost universally been accepted as a “very good thing”, has the Children’s Society waxing lyrical about how this ...
  • The Coase Theorem

    The Coase Theorem

    James Hill | | Economy
    As a colleague once said to me, “There’s a good reason why Coase called his article ‘The Problem of Social Cost’.” The reason is that, as Coase realized, there are no easy answers to instances where individuals impose costs on each other.The Coase Theorem (a term coined by George Stigler) ...
  • UK unemployment rate: a long way to go

    UK unemployment rate: a long way to go

    Ryan Bourne | | Economy
          Another welcome fall in the three-month moving average UK unemployment rate today. But a long way to go to get back to the levels we saw pre-crash. Supply-side policies please ...
  • Who’s done more fiscal consolidation: the US or the UK?

    Who’s done more fiscal consolidation: the US or the UK?

    Ryan Bourne | | Economy
    There was some debate a couple of weeks ago when Allister Heath cited CEBR research which suggested that the US had in fact done more fiscal consolidation than the UK. Ben Chu (who later did an updated post vindicating Allister’s numbers as correct, with caveats) at first claimed this was ...
  • George Osborne’s speech: the economics and the politics

    George Osborne’s speech: the economics and the politics

    Ryan Bourne | | Economy
    George Osborne’s big economic speech today has understandably drawn a lot of attention from economic and political commentators alike. That’s because the speech was an attempt to reframe both the economic and political debates. The reaction suggests he’s touched a nerve of those who most heavily argued against his deficit ...
  • Scepticism of “evidence-based policy” is a good thing

    Scepticism of “evidence-based policy” is a good thing

    Ryan Bourne | | Economy
    A few weeks ago I wrote an article for City AM explaining why I hate the term “evidence-based policy”. It’s chucked around like confetti  in the wonk-ish world of think-tanks, and is usually met unthinkingly with generous knowing nods of approval whenever it is said. “We need to establish what works,” ...
  • A time series look at household net contributions/receipt from government

    A time series look at household net contributions/receipt from government

    Ryan Bourne | | Economy
    My piece in City AM today looks at how the proportion of households who are net recipients of the state (defined as those who receive more in benefits and benefits-in-kind than they pay in taxes) has changed since 1979.As the chart below shows, this has historically troughed at around 43-44 ...
  • US vs UK labour market

    US vs UK labour market

    Ryan Bourne | | Economy
    Last month I wrote for City AM about how Ed Balls was wrong to laud the US recovery when he was launching his so-called “inclusive prosperity” commission. Balls and other have a tendency to set out the US and UK as if we have something close to a natural experiment: ...
  • Say's Law and stimulus spending

    Say's Law and stimulus spending

    David S. D'Amato | | Economy
    Recently, in the course of comparing the economies of the United States and United Kingdom, Ryan Bourne and Tim Knox noted that Brits “are still consuming and borrowing too much relative to our saving and production.” The questions of how to encourage saving, and thus capital formation, and conversely to ...
  • Are we there yet?

    Are we there yet?

    Ryan Bourne | | Economy
    This article is an excerpt from the CPS Growth Bulletin, authored by Ryan Bourne and Tim Knox. To read the full article, click here. To sign up for our mailings, use the form on the left of our newsletter page.Westminster has gone quiet in the past week as Members of Parliament and their staff ...
  • A Return to Conventional Monetary Policy Will Kill off the Case for Fiscal Stimulus

    A Return to Conventional Monetary Policy Will Kill off the Case for Fiscal Stimulus

    Oliver Latham | | Economy
    One of the big insights of macroeconomics in the last 40 years or so is that, where possible, demand management is best left to monetary rather than fiscal policy. Incredibly, this reasoning successfully permeated the thinking of policy makers in this country and elsewhere.The only time you will find any ...