MENU
Your location:

Blog

  • If UKIP wants to survive it needs a Tory victory and SNP success

    If UKIP wants to survive it needs a Tory victory and SNP success

    Lewis Brown | | Politics
    It was somewhat interesting to see the English and Scottish versions of The Sun newspaper set out their different party endorsements this morning – the London-based publication prefers the Conservatives, citing one of the reasons as ‘keeping the SNP out’, while their Glasgow counterpart encouraged readers to vote for the ...
  • Competition can crush Crony Corporatism 

    Competition can crush Crony Corporatism 

    Adam Memon | | Economy
    This article is taken from the CPS Economic Bulletin written by Adam Memon and Tim Knox. To receive it by email, sign up here. Competition is at the heart of what makes capitalism so effective at increasing prosperity. Companies which fear losing their customers to current or future rivals are forced ...
  • Green or Communist? Take the manifesto test!

    Green or Communist? Take the manifesto test!

    Owen Brady | | Politics
    The Communist Party has released their General Election manifesto, to great fanfare (well, one of their candidates got to go on Daily Politics). Without wanting to give too much away, much of it seems to be not particularly Communist, and occasionally less left-wing than the Green Party.Can you identify which ...
  • Nothing progressive about opposing wider asset ownership

    Nothing progressive about opposing wider asset ownership

    Adam Memon | | Economy
    In recent days, a variety of proposals aimed at spreading asset ownership have come under fierce criticism from so-called progressives. In particular, the proposals to extend the Right to Buy and to sell Lloyds bank shares to individuals have been condemned by people claiming to be “progressives” who care about ...
  • Iceland rips up the rulebook on central banking?

    Iceland rips up the rulebook on central banking?

    Owen Brady | | Economy
    Iceland has had a pretty tough time, recently.Following the collapse of its banking sector in 2008, unemployment tripled and the country was forced to accept a bailout from the IMF. To add insult to injury, the country’s McDonald’s franchise shut up shop, leaving the last remaining McDonald’s meal in the ...
  • When a balanced budget means more borrowing

    When a balanced budget means more borrowing

    Adam Memon | | Economy
    It is quite common for politicians to distinguish borrowing for current spending and borrowing for investment purposes. The Conservatives and UKIP propose to reach an absolute budget surplus by 2018/19 and Labour proposes to achieve a budget balance on current spending by 2020. When politicians only say that they want ...
  • Extending right-to-buy will transform the prospects of low income families

    Extending right-to-buy will transform the prospects of low income families

    Adam Memon | | Economy
    This article originally appeared in City A.M., Wednesday 15 April 2015. The centrepiece of the Conservative Party manifesto, unveiled yesterday, was a significant expansion of the right-to-buy scheme. Giving families the ability to own their own home is a wonderful thing, and extending the scheme to housing associations, as the Conservatives ...
  • Whatever happened to free-market UKIP?

    Whatever happened to free-market UKIP?

    Owen Brady | | Politics
    Looking back at an interview of Nigel Farage at the IEA in 2010, it was striking to see him give such a direct, unambiguous, principled argument in favour of free trade:“If we are going to be a successful nation …, part of the 21st-century global economy, then protectionism [is] a ...
  • Increasing the Personal Allowance is still a powerful tool

    Increasing the Personal Allowance is still a powerful tool

    Adam Memon | | Tax
    It was mildly amusing to see the Lib Dems recently complaining that the Conservatives were claiming the credit for having increased the Personal Allowance. They seem to have forgotten that it was the Centre for Policy Studies which first proposed increasing the Personal Allowance to £10,000 back in 2001. This ...
  • Current Account Deficit - Reasons not to worry

    Current Account Deficit - Reasons not to worry

    Owen Brady | | Economy
    The UK economy has produced some record-breaking data, according to an ONS bulletin released last week. In 2014, the current-account deficit was at its largest, by a certain measure, since records began in 1948. It was valued at 5.5% of GDP, or £98bn. A record-breaking deficit may inspire concern – ...
  • Time for TEE - The unification of pensions and ISAs

    Time for TEE - The unification of pensions and ISAs

    Michael Johnson | | Economy
    Today, two disparate worlds The savings landscape is characterised by a fundamental schism.  Saving within a pensions framework provides tax relief on the way in (“EET”), whereas subscriptions to New ISAs (“ISAs”) are made with post-tax income, but withdrawals are tax-free.[1]  Consequently, ISAs are “TEE”.                                                                                                      Over the last ...
  • Restricting Zero Hours Contracts won't increase job security

    Restricting Zero Hours Contracts won't increase job security

    Adam Memon | | Economy
    The proposal today from Labour to give people who have worked on a zero-hours contract for 12 weeks the right to a regular contract is interesting but ultimately misguided. A flexible labour market is vital for a dynamic economy and it has kept unemployment lower than it otherwise would have ...